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Wednesday, July 8, 2020 | History

1 edition of Economic diversification in the oil-producing countries found in the catalog.

Economic diversification in the oil-producing countries

Economic diversification in the oil-producing countries

the case of the Gulf Cooperation Council economies

  • 250 Want to read
  • 5 Currently reading

Published by United Nations in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Diversification in industry -- Persian Gulf States.,
  • Persian Gulf States -- Economic policy.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementEconomic and Social Commission for Western Asia.
    ContributionsUnited Nations. Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationviii, 50 p. ;
    Number of Pages50
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL20992683M

    It is the singular oil-producer country that has successfully embarked on economic diversification despite its abundance of oil resources. Suffice it to say, Norway remains the exemplar of a. The solution is for oil-producing countries to develop economic diversification and entrepreneurship plans, said Mazaheri. Countries that are successfully beginning to overcome the paradox of oil wealth have begun investing in manufacturing, agriculture, and services.

      Based on the arithmetic in Appendix 1, the extent of the debilitating economic effects of a major oil price shock in an oil-producing economy is hypothesized to depend on the price elasticity of oil supply, the degree of economic diversification and cross-sector elasticities of product supply and of prices with respect to oil price. Economies. What Drives Successful Economic Diversification in Resource-Rich Countries? with Addisu A. Lashitew and Eric Werker World Bank Research Observer, forthcoming. What do we know about export diversification in oil-producing countries? Extractive Industries and Society,

      The imperative for economic diversification in resource-rich countries remains strong, given highly volatile commodity prices and the low employment potential of extractive sectors. The International Monetary Fund, for example, calls for “greater economic diversification [which] would unlock job-creating growth, [and] increase resilience to. 2. Patterns of Diversification. Key Terms. Economic diversification falls into two major types: economic (product) diversification and export diversification. Economic diversification is generally defined as the process in which the economy becomes more diverse in terms of goods and services it .


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Economic diversification in the oil-producing countries Download PDF EPUB FB2

Stanford Libraries' official online search tool for books, media, journals, databases, government documents and more. Economic diversification in the oil-producing countries: the case of the Gulf Cooperation Council economies in SearchWorks catalog.

Economic diversification in the oil-producing countries. New York: United Nations, (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, International government publication, Internet resource: Document Type: Book, Internet Resource: All Authors / Contributors: Gulf Cooperation Council.; United Nations.

Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia. United Nations. Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia.

Economic diversification in the oil-producing countries: the case of the Gulf Cooperation Council economies / Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia United Nations New York Australian/Harvard Citation.

United Nations. Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia. economic diversification in oil-exporting Arab countries.1,2,3 The paper is organized in two parts.

The first part lays out the stylized facts on oil-exporting Arab countries as well as the motivation for economic diversification. It underlines the heterogeneity in conditions across oil-exporting ArabFile Size: 1MB. This is important to draw some conclusions on the main determinants of diversification in the group of a selected oil producing countries: Indonesia, Iran, Kuwait, Oman, and Venezuela.

Investment, and other few variables, is turn to be one of the most important determinants. The paper concludes by a set of policy recommendations. The present paper aims, on the one hand, to test the impact of oil rents on economic growth and examine the main symptoms of the resource curse phenomenon in oil-abundant MENA countries, and on the other hand, to investigate the role of governance in avoiding the resource curse and turning oil rents into a tool for economic diversification in 11 MENA oil exporters (Algeria, Bahrain.

Topic One: Economic Diversification of Oil Based Economies Background: The Organisation of Petroleum Exporting Countries was founded in as a result of dependant economy. Countries like Venezuela are the ones that the UN and its various organs often target to present the benefits of economic diversification in the least invasive fashion.

The collapse in oil prices – which started in and is expected to be protracted – has put diversification at the forefront of the policy debate in the oil-producing countries of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). But although many fossil fuel exporters understand the need to diversify, few have successfully done so.

Historically, Continued. countries face similar challenges to create jobs and foster more inclusive growth. The current environment of likely durable low oil prices has exacerbated these challenges. The non-oil private sector remains relatively small and, consequently, has been only a limited source of growth and employment.

Because oil is an exhaustible resource, new sectors need to be developed so they can. While economic diversification is of particular importance for mineral- and commodity-dependent countries (and even more so in the face of declining commodity prices), it is a challenge for most developing countries as they seek to deliver higher-productivity jobs for growing workforces.

A new study analyzes the political economy of the resource curse to understand what drives economic diversification in resource-rich countries. meaningful economic diversification, reflecting the effect of the so-called “Dutch disease”.

The need to correct the existing structural distortions and put the economy on the path of sustainable growth through diversification of non-oil product export is therefore compelling. For these oil-producing countries, in fact, the decline in oil prices is having significant effects on production, consumption and public finance, creating an uncertain economic environment.

Several studies, including those from the World Bank (e.g. Lederman, Maloney, ; Hesse, ) and the IMF book. According to The Heritage Foundation’s Index of Economic Freedom, only four of 15 OPEC countries rank among the top economically free countries in the world.

Consistent with endogenous growth theory, countries with more educated populations saw greater growth in their nonresource sectors than countries with less educated populations, though education is associated with greater export concentration.

Market proximity does not affect diversification. Internal economic diversification in the 21st. Economic diversification has become an important development goal among medium-income countries, especially among those relying on the export of commodities such as Chile, Peru, Saudi Arabia, and Kazakhstan.

Given past research, the obvious intuition is to follow a pragmatic strategy focused only on related activities. The NWP aims to promote the understanding of economic diversification as well as the development and dissemination of related knowledge resources to assist all Parties, and in particular developing countries, to take informed adaptation action (FCCC/CP//5/Add.1 paragraph 3(b)(v)).

Institutional foundations of export diversification patterns in oil-producing countries Article in Journal of Comparative Economics 42(4) February with 69 Reads How we measure 'reads'.

Economic diversification is a key element of economic development in which a country moves to a more diverse pro-duction and trade structure.

A lack of economic diversification is often associated with increased vulnerability to external shocks that can undermine prospects for longer-term economic growth. The world’s poorest countries, many. 1 What Do We Know About Economic Diversification in Oil-Producing Countries?1 Michael L.

Ross2 UCLA and Oxford University Janu Abstract: countries dependent on oil and mineral exports are often advised to diversify their economies, yet surprisingly little is known about how this can be done.

In book: Economic Diversification in the Gulf Region, Volume I, pp Cite this publication. Ashraf Mishrif. Kuwait but also in non-oil-producing countries such as Egypt, Jordan.Countries dependent on oil and mineral exports are often advised to diversify their economies, yet surprisingly little is known about how this can be done.

This paper reviews the recent literature on diversification in resource-dependent states and suggests it has been constrained by missing and inconsistent data, and a reliance on.

Torrents of corruption swept across oil-producing countries from towhen the price of oil reached historic heights. I covered this deluge in my recent book Crude Intentions: How Oil Corruption Contaminates the World.

But when discussing the book recently, I’ve been asked: what does oil corruption look like now that prices have reached historic lows, and companies and oil-producing.